Using Twitter as a promotional tool

[mpoverlay] Three tweets below…guess which one I clicked on?

BREAKING: Kentucky defeats Kansas 67-59 to win the NCAA national title
Kentucky beats Kansas 67-59 to win the 2012 NCAA men’s basketball championship game –
Kentucky Wildcats beat Kansas Jayhawks 67-59 to win NCAA men’s basketball title
The one with a link!  Add links to your tweets!
Now back to our regular program, already in progress…

The key … is to understand audio consumers, what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor audio offerings and advertising to be most effective.

-AllAccess.com

The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf
The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf
The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf
The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf
The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf
The
key to capitalizing on this potential is to understand audio consumers,
what motivates them to listen and how to use that information to tailor
audio offerings and advertising to be most effective. – See more at:
http://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/130969/new-nielsen-study-categorizes-audio-consumers#sthash.RAKo0KkT.dpuf

Audience listens to content that has value to them, and that content should be tailored to be as user-friendly as possible.  Here’s an example of a tweet, by Minneapolis based sports radio host Phil Mackey, that came close to nailing this goal:

Talk about a GREAT hook, delivered with a sense of urgency (“now”) on something that matters to the local sports fan.  It peaked my interest and made me want to consume the content.  But was it effective?  Unfortunately not for me as I was not able to listen on my iPhone when I clicked the link because…

…I was sent to their site – a GREAT site for MN sports fans I may add – instead of being directed to the station’s live stream.  I have no idea what he said, meaning I did not receive the content I desired, thus was left dissatisfied.  Imagine how often this happens with your audience.

A great tease by the host, but poor product execution.

Understand, I’m not only spotlighting 1500 ESPN (which may have the best site of any sports station in the country) but our entire industry. From the audience perspective, listeners should be able to click a link that takes them right to live audio.

Considering that your audience is likely to be in their car when consuming your content, shouldn’t this be easier?  According to a survey by Jacobs Media, “…three-fourths (75%)
own a smartphone…and now more
than half (55%) stream audio at least
weekly…”.

I suggest it’s time we made it easier for our listeners to consume our content in the place they use, and desire, it.

 

If you think about your product from the audience’s perspective, shouldn’t the viewer on their phone look something like the dashboard of your grandparents car?

Step back for a moment and imagine your audience and how they will use your product. Your tweets, Facebook posts, apps, etc., should be as user friendly as possible.

One click to content.

On the plus side, one can turn great live content (like what Mackey tweeted) and re-imagine it as evergreen content via podcasting.  And his GREAT hook will work again, and again, and again.

Here’s hoping they make it a podcast as I’d like to know what he said.

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Update: Mackey posted an interesting and well researched note on his blog that is a great illustration of how on-air content translates to online content.

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MORE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

I thought this study (Data: Strategies for Effective Tweeting: A Statistical Review) by Buddy Media had pretty good info for radio folks to consider. Go ahead and read it and then let’s discuss…
…waiting…
Quite a read, huh? Man you read slowly. Your lips okay?
A quick note before we jump into this…I’m not as sold on Twitter as these guys are, and question how valuable it actually is. Frankly, it feels like a fad that will fade away once the new thing comes along. But, it is a way to reach and engage an audience quickly, even when they are not listening. To be clear, I’m not saying it is without value, I’m simply saying it’s overvalued right now.
My thoughts:
  • Add links to drive retweet rates: I totally agree and have blogged about it before. Include a link to your tweets as often as possible. It’s important to share something of value. When I send a tweet out for the John Curley Show, I always write a hook and include the stations dial position and a link to the stream, or podcast as I want to grab attention while making it as easy as possible for them to consume the product.
  • Keep tweets short: I agree with this, although we all know that can be difficult with 140 characters. But, keeping it short allows others to share your tweet, which is vital to growing your audience and new revenue streams.
How I see Twitter.
  • Don’t over-tweet: Agree and disagree. Agree in that I find myself unfollowing a lot of people in radio because the constantly tweet drivel.  But disagree with Buddy Media when they say four per day max’. You be the judge of what your followers want. My feeling is that it’s okay to tweet something with great value multiple times, especially considering Twitter is like a conveyor belt. For instance, if you score a great interview, write a hilarious bit or have an epic take that “does not suck,” that link is worth tweeting a few times so everyone actually sees the tweet when they are experiencing the Twittersphere.
  • Facebook: Not sure I agree.  They say use Facebook outside of prime hours. The kids at Mashable said this in 2010: “The three biggest usage spikes (on Facebook) tend to occur on weekdays at 11:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. ET.” and “The biggest spike occurs at 3:00 p.m. ET on weekdays.” I like the idea of using Facebook at key points of the day and evening.
  • Use a retweet call to action: I love this idea, and think it has tremendous value, especially if you share great content with your followers. Help them be mavens for you.
If I could have you take away one idea from this blog today, it would be that it’s important to create great content that can be consumed on multiple, shareable (is that a word?) platforms. Clearly you’re creating great stuff, now it’s time to go where your audience is and to wave your arms until they notice that great stuff.
Man, we are totally outside the box.  We are so outside the box, we need someone to Facebook a tweet from google maps to us on Pinterest.  I don’t know what I just said.
Here’s the cheat sheet Buddy Media created…pretty cool.

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